Wildlife & Wild Life


via fuckyeahwoolsocks / 1 year ago / 260,005 notes /

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via iscruel / 1 year ago / 6,970 notes /

(Source: kittycatdaily)

via theanimalblog / 1 year ago / 25,267 notes /

jtotheizzoe:

When do we stop seeing the animal, and start seeing ourselves?

Photographer Tim Flach challenges you with that question, in his new book More Than Human. Every single one of his photos, from scary bats to naked chickens, is breathtaking. 

We are becoming aware of more examples of animal intelligence, from the language of whales to the self-awareness and empathy of the great apes. Whereas one’s emotional response to what appears to be a ponderous panda used to be thought of as folly, we are now able to appreciate a wider spectrum of animal thought and processing.

It does not mean that there is deep thought in those eyes, but it blurs the lines of where our stare stops and theirs begins.There is something. What? Who knows?

We would do well to remind ourselves not where animals are like us, but perhaps where we are like them. These photos do that for me. 

See more at Brain Pickings.

via jtotheizzoe / 1 year ago / 1,355 notes /
via iscruel / 1 year ago / 225 notes /

via whalesharethemoon / 1 year ago / 22 notes /
jtotheizzoe:

Singing the Dinner Bell!
Okay, this wave of “animals communicating in crazy ways” is getting a bit overwhelming. Just when I think I’ve heard about the coolest adaptations of animal “language”, I find something better. We’ve seen a whale mimicking human speech, an elephant (sort of) speaking Korean, and now this story about birds and secretly coded dinner passwords…
The bird world is full of cuckoldry. That’s a crude word for the biological phenomenon called “brood parasitism”, where birds like cuckoos lay their eggs in the nests of other birds. The invaders are cared for by unsuspecting bird parents, who are apparently not smart enough to see that one of these things is very clearly not like the other.
Finding food for screaming kids takes a lot of work, and it’s to a bird’s evolutionary advantage if they can focus on feeding their own offspring. The superb fairy wren (which is now so aptly named it’s not funny) developed a trick to solve that problem.
They sing a song to their young. While they are still in their eggs. And after they hatch, the chicks have to incorporate that song into their feeding chirps to get the goods! It’s almost too awesome to be true!
But it’s real science. Check out more over at Nature News, with a link there to the research paper and some of the bird songs. Very cool!

jtotheizzoe:

Singing the Dinner Bell!

Okay, this wave of “animals communicating in crazy ways” is getting a bit overwhelming. Just when I think I’ve heard about the coolest adaptations of animal “language”, I find something better. We’ve seen a whale mimicking human speech, an elephant (sort of) speaking Korean, and now this story about birds and secretly coded dinner passwords…

The bird world is full of cuckoldry. That’s a crude word for the biological phenomenon called “brood parasitism”, where birds like cuckoos lay their eggs in the nests of other birds. The invaders are cared for by unsuspecting bird parents, who are apparently not smart enough to see that one of these things is very clearly not like the other.

Finding food for screaming kids takes a lot of work, and it’s to a bird’s evolutionary advantage if they can focus on feeding their own offspring. The superb fairy wren (which is now so aptly named it’s not funny) developed a trick to solve that problem.

They sing a song to their young. While they are still in their eggs. And after they hatch, the chicks have to incorporate that song into their feeding chirps to get the goods! It’s almost too awesome to be true!

But it’s real science. Check out more over at Nature News, with a link there to the research paper and some of the bird songs. Very cool!

via jtotheizzoe / 1 year ago / 236 notes /

(Source: cantatis-amor)

via racing-into-oblivion / 1 year ago / 796,429 notes /

via spiritual-ism / 1 year ago / 2 notes /
getting excited for my summer

getting excited for my summer

via farawaymelody / 2 years ago / 11 notes /
via deviantbirds / 2 years ago / 5 notes /
to my lovely. 
love me 
bluesongstress:

I mean it! Because you’re awesome.

to my lovely. 

love me 

bluesongstress:

I mean it! Because you’re awesome.

via bluesongstress / 2 years ago / 265 notes /
via fat-birds / 2 years ago / 2,066 notes /

(Source: Flickr / axecore)

via just-breezy / 2 years ago / 2,322 notes /
christophben:

Sounds like a dream trip come true.

christophben:

Sounds like a dream trip come true.

via christophben / 2 years ago / 22 notes /
 
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